All News

May 10, 2017

Connecting brain regions in a dish – A new organoid technology to detect malfunctions in the brain

Scientists at IMBA (Institute of Molecular Biotechnology) describe novel organoid technology combining various brain regions for investigation of epilepsy, and other neurological diseases, as reported in the current issue of Nature Methods.

April 25, 2017

Josef Penninger receives CEE Innovation Award

Vienna, April 25th 2017 For his extraordinary scientific achievements and his international pioneering role in genetics and cancer research Josef Penninger, Scientific Director of IMBA (Austrian Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) was awarded the second CEE Innovation Award.

April 11, 2017

Tuberculosis: Researchers Uncover how Bacteria Burst our Cells

Scientists based in Vienna unveil the complex molecular structure that causes lethal infections by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Their findings might have implications for potential therapies against antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis.

April 06, 2017

Researchers initiate cross-disciplinary bioethics symposium at IMBA

Inquisitiveness, academic freedom, and a pioneer spirit are what drive many scientists to answer previously unsolved questions, collect new findings, and sometimes even open up completely new fields of research. These fields include the first human brain organoid and the CRISPR/Cas9 “gene shears”, both developed in Vienna. Each has enormous potential for modern medicine. But biotechnological innovations lead to any number of questions and pose new challenges for our society.

March 29, 2017

Unique genome architectures after fertilisation in single-cell embryos

Using a newly developed method researchers at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA) have been able to shed light on the complexity of genome reorganization occurring during the first hours after fertilization in the single-cell mammalian embryo. Their findings have recently been published in the journal Nature. The team of researchers (from three continents) have discovered that the egg and sperm genomes that co-exist in the single-cell embryo or zygote have a unique structure compared to other interphase cells. Understanding this specialized chromatin “ground state” has the potential to provide insights into the yet mysterious process of epigenetic reprogramming to totipotency, the ability to give rise to all cell types.

The Vienna Biocenter in the third district of Vienna has established itself as the premier location for life sciences in Central Europe and is a world-leading international bio-medical research center.

 

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