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January 19, 2017

Scientists initiate first ethical guidelines for organs cultivated in vitro

In the latest edition of the professional journal “Science”, Jürgen Knoblich, a leading authority on stem cells and deputy director of the IMBA (Institute for Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences), together with international experts, presents a first ethical guideline for research into human organ models. In the article, he also argues for critical and responsible engagement with the new technology.

January 03, 2017

IMBA – The year in review: 2016 brought top-level research funding and scientific milestones

In 2016, IMBA – Institute of Molecular Biotechnology at the Austrian Academy of Sciences received the prestigious “Proof of Concept” grant from the European Research Council (ERC) as well as two fellowships in the renowned EMBO Young Investigator Programme. A series of scientific achievements could pave the way for new treatment options in the future, including the possible prevention of breast cancer, new treatments for deadly fungal infections, and improvements in assisted reproduction.

December 20, 2016

Brain organoids 'made in Austria' resemble original to a great extent

Scientists find striking similarities in function, structure and even epigenetic features.

December 01, 2016

Fertilized egg cells trigger and monitor loss of sperm’s epigenetic memory

Scientists from the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA) in Vienna, Austria, have discovered how an embryo’s genomic integrity is safeguarded during the first 24 h after fertilization. Insights into this mechanism have implications for improving in vitro fertilization.

November 16, 2016

A milestone in small RNA biology: piRNA biogenesis from start to finish

Organisms are in a constant battle against viruses, or transposable elements, which invade their genomes. Among their most effective weapons are silencing pathways that use small RNAs to selectively target invading nucleic acids for their destruction. The molecular understanding of these defense systems has revolutionized modern molecular biology, as they are the basis for powerful genome editing and gene silencing methods such as CRISPR/Cas9 or RNA interference. Scientists from the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology in Austria (IMBA) have now unravelled the precise mechanisms by which germline cells produce a class of small RNAs, called piRNAs, that control transposon silencing in animals.

The Vienna Biocenter in the third district of Vienna has established itself as the premier location for life sciences in Central Europe and is a world-leading international bio-medical research center.

 

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